PTSD Treatment in Utah - Long Term Effects of PTSD

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD statistics according to The National Center for PTSD show, "about 6 of every 10 men (or 60%) and 5 of every 10 women (or 50%) experience at least one trauma in their lives. In other words, PTSD is not unique to those enlisted in the military. Even an intense life experience, such as a debilitating addiction to drugs or alcohol (or during the detoxification process) can result in stress and anxiety that is severe enough to be treated as post-traumatic stress. Often, patients that enter rehab may discover they have a dual diagnosis or a co-occurring mental illness that must be treated along with the symptoms of addiction. Continue reading to learn more about PTSD causes and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, to determine if treatment for negative life experience should be a part of your or your loved one's treatment in Utah.

Is Your Loved One Suffering From PTSD? Pathways Can Help

What is PTSD?

Post-traumatic stress disorder is a mental health disorder that occurs after a person has experienced a traumatic event or life experience. In the past, PTSD has been referred to as "combat fatigue", but we know today that this issue is not exclusive to the military. Anyone can develop this condition while recovering from the shock of something seen, heard, or experienced. Some situations that can result in PTSD are:

  • The unexpected death of a child or loved one
  • Persons involved in a severe car accident or fire
  • Victims of a violent crime such as sexual or physical assault
  • Childhood abuse, usually physical and/or sexual
  • Witnessing death, especially in combat

These post-traumatic stress disorder causes can result in extreme emotions and physical reactions such as re-living the incident through nightmares or flashbacks; bouts of extreme fear, anger, or sadness; and strong negative reactions to ordinary situations that may bring a rush of memories - such as a loud noise, a child crying, or crowds of people.

6 PTSD Symptoms

  1. Physical reactions - sweating, tremors, fast heart rate
  2. Being 'on edge' or easily startled
  3. Nightmares and frightening thoughts
  4. Strong feelings of guilt, fear, or depression
  5. Loss of interest in people and activities
  6. Inability to remember details of an event
Long Term Effects of PTSD - Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Treatment in Utah

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post-traumatic stress disorder is a mental health disorder that occurs after a person has experienced a traumatic event or life experience. In the past, PTSD has been referred to as "combat fatigue", but we know today that this issue is not exclusive to the military. Anyone can develop this condition while recovering from the shock of something seen, heard, or experienced. Some situations that can result in PTSD are:

  • The unexpected death of a child or loved one
  • Persons involved in a severe car accident or fire
  • Victims of a violent crime such as sexual or physical assault
  • Childhood abuse, usually physical and/or sexual
  • Witnessing death, especially in combat

Additionally, once the patient has been properly diagnosed with PTSD, there are a variety of medications to reduce symptoms and enable persons with PTSD to live productive lives. These medications may help improve sleep, treat depression, and reduce anxiety.

Why Choose Pathways?

  • Inpatient as well as Outpatient Treatment Option
  • Treatment programs designed around each unique client
  • Find REAL solutions
  • Financing and Insurance Options available
  • Pathways team is available 24/7
  • Free Assessment

Frequently Asked Questions on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

All people of any age are at risk of a PTSD attack if subjected to conditions that make them vulnerable to developing this mental health disorder. This condition is not limited to people in the military. It can also impact victims of assault or abuse, individuals in devastating accidents, people exposed to disastrous events, the death of a loved one, emotional abuse, or other trauma-inducing occurrences.
Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) is the natural experience of anxiety symptoms following a distressing event. These symptoms typically disappear within several weeks or so. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is the experience of continuing symptoms either soon after the traumatic event or possibly weeks or even some months after the impactful event.
Yes, fortunately, PTSD is often treated effectively with therapeutic methods applied by mental health specialists. PTSD treatment can feature various forms of talk therapy, such as psychotherapy, cognitive, and behavioral therapy. Medication may also be used for PTSD treatment in some cases. Inpatient treatment for PTSD may be recommended for some people, followed by outpatient therapy to help with transitioning back into daily life.
Living with this disorder over time can cause turmoil in virtually all areas of a person’s life. The long-term effects of PTSD can include severe impacts on an individual’s personal relationships, job, and quality of daily life, and ultimately his or her physical health can suffer. Further, PTSD may exacerbate or even cause other mental health problems, like anxiety, depression, or alcohol or drug abuse disorders, among others.
Learn about the disorder so you can understand what the individual is experiencing. The best approach to helping is to encourage the victim to get appropriate post-traumatic stress disorder treatment. Help him or her engage in the kinds of activities that help them re-adjust to normal daily life again. For example, invite him/her to participate in de-stressing pastimes that help with relaxation and developing healthy relationships. Listen and let him or her know you understand that they’re struggling with the problem. Most importantly, maintain your patience.
Yes, emotional abuse is among the common post-traumatic stress disorder causes. Since a victim of emotional abuse often experiences a deeply painful event repeatedly over an extended length of time, the resulting disorder might be different from PTSD from a single event. The symptoms may fit complex PTSD, in which instead of overcoming one traumatic occurrence, the person is affected by the infliction of recurring traumatic abuse and neglect. People with this form of PTSD may need more extensive therapy to overcome the effects of long-term abuse.
People struggling with PTSD often live in a condition of feeling continuous emotional stress. PTSD can also cause sleep issues, leaving the victim frequently over-tired and tense, which can cause them to be hyper-reactive to typical daily stressors. Additionally, anger may substitute for grief or their feelings of helplessness or guilt.The anger can enable the victim to feel less vulnerable and more in control. But the psychological attempt to regain a sense of personal strength while striving not to express anger can add stress and lead to eruptions of anger. There are special therapeutic methods that can help people manage anger issues stemming from PTSD.
Most often, PTSD symptoms begin to emerge within the first three months or so after a person experiences trauma. However, individuals respond to events in different ways, and in some cases, symptoms might not begin for some years after the event.

Pathways Offers PTSD Treatment Services in Utah

Consider a therapist in Utah at Pathways for PTSD treatment as part of your medical team to help you or your loved one recover from post-traumatic stress disorder by learning to detach from the trauma and live each moment and each day free from the past.

Download PDF